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Computer Science & Computer Information Systems

This guide covers selected resources for researching Computer Science available through the Wolfgram Library.

IT Classes Online

Online videos, tutorials and classes for many programming languages and software.

Just visit LinkedIn Learning and use your Widener login ID and password—the same ones you use for Office 365 or CampusCruiser.

 

Evaluating Web Resources

Currency refers to the timeliness of the information. Ask:

  • When was the information posted or published?
  • Has the information been revised or updated?
  • Does your topic require current, up-to-date information? 
  • Are the links functional?

Relevance refers to the importance of the information to your topic. Ask:

  • Does the information relate to your topic or answer your question?
  • Who is the intended audience?
  • Is the information, language, and terminology at an appropriate level (not elementary, not too technical)?
  • Does this source add to your body of knowledge on the topic?

Authority refers to the source of the information. Ask:

  • Who is the author/publisher/source?
  • What makes this author/publisher/source an authority on this topic?
  • What are the author's credentials?
  • What is the URL domain (.com, .gov, .edu, .org)?

Accuracy refers to the reliability, truthfulness and correctness of the content. Ask:

  • Is the content making extraordinary claims or claims that sound very different from other research you have found?
  • Is the information supported by evidence such as links to other credible sources or a reference list?
  • Has the information been reviewed or refereed? 
  • Is the language unbiased and objective?
  • Are there spelling, grammar or typographical errors?

Purpose refers to the reason the information exists. Ask:

  • Is the information posted to inform, teach, sell, entertain, or persuade?
  • Does the author express personal opinions?
  • Is the content objective and impartial?
  • Is the content trying to sell a product, service or idea?
  • Is the website satire?

Web Resources

From Wolfgram's Database Collection:

Steaming Video